Tag Archive | Calamansi

A Nice Surprise

This afternoon, I gardened for a while planting  Birds of Paradise and adding soil to some of my potted plants.  The Boungain villea I have outside is now gone. It was uprooted, the trunk  was so brittle. I have one in a pot but it hasn’t flowered yet.

Our Calamansi trees are in the middle of producing so many fruits. Just harvested  more than a kilo this afternoon, they were so large 🙂 .  These are just from one tree, I haven’t touched the other one yet.

And this is a nice surprise. I noticed it among my Crossandra blooms while I was watering the plants. A robust and healthy green pepper.We usually use this for our sinigang.  I don’t even remember  planting it before.

And these are considered fruits too? In the market, they are classified as veggies.  Notice the flowers and the lone green pepper.

Catching Up

Spent an afternoon yesterday and an early morning today cutting the carabao grass closer to the roots. It’s a monthly activity that cannot be avoided. Tooks some shots early this morning while the sun was still hiding.

The carabao grass grows rapidly so I decided to cut it closer to the roots.

I miss our Koi fish at the pond.

I need to transfer some of those prayer plants.

A cluster of pink Bougainvillea.

My calamansi trees bear fruits at all times of the year.

Quite a nice surprise. It may turn into a lovely butterfly yet.

One of our jackfruits trees….early fruiting!

 

Practicing With My New Camera Phone

It’s been a while, and I mean the last time I updated this site was more than two months ago. I love my new phone camera. So easy to take photos. Tried it again this morning taking photos of plants thriving in the garden.

Fire spike or mottled toothed thread.

 

When the flowers mature, they would look like  green Celosia.

 

They are called Golden Candle or shrimp plants.

 

My Pink Angels but I am sure there is another name for it.

 

This is where my Gardenia used to be. I miss its lovely and scented blooms.

 

My Crossandra flowers. They bloom everywhere in the garden.

 

Bleeding Hearts. Would you believe, the actual flowers are the red ones at the tip.

 

My Calamansi trees. Can you see the green and light yellow fruits?

 

 

Life In Our Neighborhood

This is just lovely. I gave about half a kilo of freshly picked calamansi (Philippine lime) to one of our neighbors and she gave me back two lemons from her backyard plus a pot of Korean ginseng. This is the first time I’ve seen a Korean ginseng plant and she told me that the flowers are red like berries. She’s been growing this pot for about a year now from the mother plant. Ginseng has lots of medicinal value. What I’ve only seen in pictures are the roots of  matured plant. Really looking forward to seeing it grow. Will take some pictures tomorrow and attach them here.

Last week, another neighbor gifted me with a Zamia plant. I re-potted it into three pots. Aren’t I lucky? These are quite expensive when you buy them in garden centers. Early Christmas gifts, what do you say?

Zamia

Zamia…I love its shiny leaves.

I put them out in full morning sun everyday  until around 10am. The three pots are thriving pretty well. I am planning to transfer some of my Crossandra plants tomorrow  and use them as ground covers outside my bedroom window. I hope I would be able to wake up early to do a little gardening.

Seeing Is Believing

I feel guilty.

For several months now,  I’ve neglected updating this blog. All I got to show were some reblogged posts  from my main blog here at WordPress. I’ve finally finished trimming, weeding and replanting  – the whole rigmarole of maintaining  a small garden. Of course, this post won’t be complete without some pictures I recently took of the flowers growing there. No  matter how small a garden is, it takes much of your time but it is always a delight for those lovely surprises that  it  brings.

Red Mokara Orchids

Red Mokara Orchids

Can't wait for these buds to bloom :)

Can’t wait for these buds to bloom 🙂

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I took this close-up shot early this morning. Would love to document everything here. Months from now, when it blooms again,  I would remember this, the time I wondered how the flowers would look, the times I repeatedly looked out of the window to admire it. Gosh, i’m crazy  when it comes to flowers 🙂

Oh, there is a bonus.

His name is Noki.

His name is Noki.

This is Noki, a gift from a friend. He is a half-bred Labrador/Japanese Spitz. So playful and naughty. When I’m in the garden, he would inch his big body near our fence and bark his lungs out at the passersby.  I also just harvested more than a kilo of Calamansi (Philippine lime) and gave some to our neighbors.

The joys of gardening…..so priceless!

 

Clusters

It’s nice to be back and share my garden finds. I guess it’s time to take hold of my camera again and take a few shots. Look what I’ve found.

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I didn’t plant this  tomato shrub but just saw it growing side by side with our peanut grass at the front garden. It was a delight to see these green  tomatoes waiting to ripen. Something comes to mind, botanically speaking, tomatoes are fruits  but we consider them vegetables. How’s that again? I am getting confused.

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Our two jackfruit trees are laden with fruits growing in almost every tip of each branch. The sad thing though, not all of them will grow big at all.  Mom says the fruits with smooth skin are the  ones that would  ripen and grow big, the rest will just dry up and fall. Every morning, I would count the fruits, can’t wait to harvest some  in a  month or two.

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One thing I love about our calamansi trees (we have two) are the scents of the flowers. Calamansi or Philippine lime bear fruits all year round and they are perfect in almost any dish that need a little spicing up. They could be used to  marinate meat or as sauces for grilled or fried food.  Ripe fruits are excellent  as juices too.

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Not to be left behind are my pink Bougainvillea.  I just love the pink blooms.

Garden Finds

It rains every day now and the grass grows faster and longer. Such a shame because I could not garden when the grass is wet with rain. I am afraid of mosquitoes and some insects sharing a home with my ornamental  plants and vegetables. Mom planted taro shoots a week ago and they are nicely growing outside.  Every year, the back of the house is always full of ampalaya  ( bitter gourd) occupying our garden trellis permanently fixed with tie wires.  Ampalaya is so easy to grow, it just need enough space to crawl  through. In a month or two, you would be harvesting some for the kitchen.  This morning, I harvested more than a kilo of the bonito variety and every three or four days, it would give you enough to last for a week’s supply. Most of the time though, I share my harvest with our neighbors.

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One thing about organic gardening is that you are assured that the veggies you eat are pesticide-free and you can always have them freshly picked. Aside from using this for our famous Pangasinan pinakbet, one could also mix it with scrambled eggs or as fresh salad.

Tomorrow, it’s time to pick calamansi  and make it into a refreshing juice.  The rewards of gardening!

Fresh Harvest

It’s been a while since I last posted here. having four blogs to maintain makes one neglect the others. Anyway, I’ll be updating this site from time to time, I just got so used in staying at Dreams and Escapes. It’s nice to see our modest vegetable garden bearing fruits again.

Fresh ampalaya, jute leaves and calamansi. Jute or what we call saluyot in the vernacular is medicinal too. Three days ago, I harvested more than kilo of calamansi (Philippine lime).  My son and I love calamansi juice and having a glass of freshly squeezed calamansi is better than commercially produced fruit drinks.

We also have this jackfruit growing nicely. Maybe in a month or two, it would be ready for harvest.

And these new shoots would be perfect for that yummy “ginataang langka”.

Today’s Harvest (Calamansi, Anyone?)

I took  shots of the garden blooms and some of our vegetable plants early this morning and hubby suggested that I harvest our Calamansi. We have two grafted Calamansi trees which I planted many years ago and they haven’t stopped bearing fruit.  They are part of our garden landscape.

Here in our country it is simply known as Calamondin or just plain Kalamansi but it’s known elsewhere as Philippine lime.  The flowers  emit that sweet and tangy scent much like pomelos and oranges when they are in bloom. Kalamansi is one of the most basic necessities in Philippine kitchens. It is used  for marinating either fish or meat or  sea foods and anything that requires something sour. It is also used as dip, mixed with soy sauce or  as juice drinks, hot or cold. I wonder if  we could survive  in the kitchen without these small, juicy, tangy fruits which are very similar to lime. They are best used fresh.

The fruit also has several medicinal uses. It can be a good treatment to itchy scalp, to heal insect bites, remove freckles, clear up acne and pimples. It is also used as a deodorizer and  for stain-removal.  It is also a popular home remedy for cough. And if you want your skin to stay smooth and blemish free, you can gently rub it with kalamansi before taking a bath.