Tag Archive | Calliandra Haematocephala

Life In Our Neighborhood

This is just lovely. I gave about half a kilo of freshly picked calamansi (Philippine lime) to one of our neighbors and she gave me back two lemons from her backyard plus a pot of Korean ginseng. This is the first time I’ve seen a Korean ginseng plant and she told me that the flowers are red like berries. She’s been growing this pot for about a year now from the mother plant. Ginseng has lots of medicinal value. What I’ve only seen in pictures are the roots of  matured plant. Really looking forward to seeing it grow. Will take some pictures tomorrow and attach them here.

Last week, another neighbor gifted me with a Zamia plant. I re-potted it into three pots. Aren’t I lucky? These are quite expensive when you buy them in garden centers. Early Christmas gifts, what do you say?

Zamia

Zamia…I love its shiny leaves.

I put them out in full morning sun everyday  until around 10am. The three pots are thriving pretty well. I am planning to transfer some of my Crossandra plants tomorrow  and use them as ground covers outside my bedroom window. I hope I would be able to wake up early to do a little gardening.

Powder Puff Plants

Calliandra Haematocephala , otherwise known as powder puff plant belongs to the family of Fabaceae which comprises about 200 species.  It’s a great looking bold bloomer.  The flowers thrive very well during spring, summer and even into fall.  This carefree specimen shrub is great for outdoors and can even be grown in pots.  All it needs are regular and faithful watering. It thrives in partial shade but needs full sun for maximum blooming.  It prefers moist but well-drained fertile soil.  The buds look like berries before they open into “puffs.

Powder puff plants can grow up to 3 feet tall, their size can be controlled by pruning.  They can be propagated via large cuttings or through seeds.  (Seeds are better of course).  The flowers are very soft to the touch and grow from hundreds of slender, bright-red stamens which create a powder puff effect and seem to explode out from the center of the flower.  These plants are attractive to bees and butterflies.  They are native of India, Madagascar, Mexico, South America and United States.

Took these shots from our wild garden in our province.  How I wish I could propagate them in my miniature garden at home.