Tag Archive | climbing spinach

Seeing Is Believing

I feel guilty.

For several months now,  I’ve neglected updating this blog. All I got to show were some reblogged posts  from my main blog here at WordPress. I’ve finally finished trimming, weeding and replanting  – the whole rigmarole of maintaining  a small garden. Of course, this post won’t be complete without some pictures I recently took of the flowers growing there. No  matter how small a garden is, it takes much of your time but it is always a delight for those lovely surprises that  it  brings.

Red Mokara Orchids

Red Mokara Orchids

Can't wait for these buds to bloom :)

Can’t wait for these buds to bloom 🙂

IMG_6433

I took this close-up shot early this morning. Would love to document everything here. Months from now, when it blooms again,  I would remember this, the time I wondered how the flowers would look, the times I repeatedly looked out of the window to admire it. Gosh, i’m crazy  when it comes to flowers 🙂

Oh, there is a bonus.

His name is Noki.

His name is Noki.

This is Noki, a gift from a friend. He is a half-bred Labrador/Japanese Spitz. So playful and naughty. When I’m in the garden, he would inch his big body near our fence and bark his lungs out at the passersby.  I also just harvested more than a kilo of Calamansi (Philippine lime) and gave some to our neighbors.

The joys of gardening…..so priceless!

 

Alugbati

Looking at the fruits which resemble blackberries, I was fascinated. I was looking for some subjects to practice my macro shots on early this morning when I noticed these dark purple fruits hanging in a trellis which hubby made a few months ago. I don’t eat alugbati, preferring the more popular camote tops  and the fresh young leaves of chayote.  Lots of persuasions from hubby to try it, steamed  and squeezed with kalamansi or mixed with mongo didn’t induce me  to even taste it, but he eats it like he is eating  camote tops that I like.

Known as Malabar spinach, Indian spinach or  climbing spinach, luo kui shu( in Chinese), is one of the most popular indigenous leafy vegetables in the Philippines. Originally from India, it is usually found in hedges and cultivated areas ans is extensively grown in market gardens and home gardens.

Its leaves are somewhat fleshy, ovate or heart-shaped. The fruit is fleshy  and turns purple when it matures. The young stems, leaves and shoots are blanched. One of the reasons why I get turned-off is because the flavor is a little earthy and the texture when cooked is slimy. I later learned that it has lots of uses and nutritional values. The purplish dye from the ripe fruit is used as food color while the cooked roots are used for treating diarrhea. The cooked stems and leaves are good laxative and the flowers are used as antidote for poison. A paste of the leaves is applied  to treat  boils while a paste of the root is  good for swelling.

Alugbati grows well under full sunlight in hot, humid climate like ours. It may take sometime before I’ll learn to eat this nutritional vegetable but until then, I’ll just watch hubby enjoy his plate of steamed alugbati and fried fish to go with it.