Tag Archive | family life

Our Wild Garden In Patar (Part 2)

It’s nice to have a sensible  16-megapixel primary camera on your phone that you can use on those point and shoot subjects with a handy and compact phone. The truth is, I haven’t bought a replacement yet for my broken Canon Ixus camera so I am using all the three cameras on my tab and cellphones.

Going home is such a memorable thing. Even if we only stayed there overnight, I was able to visit  those fruit trees some of which I helped Dad plant and nurture when he was still alive. They have a little plot for veggies now. I could no longer identify all the flowering plants growing there.

Not familiar with this flower.

I planned of taking home some shoots of this but I forgot.

When we woke up, our car was already clean. My brother took care of it.

San Francisco? I guess…

This driftwood has been in one corner of the garden since I can remember.

This hammock, spent a few minutes swinging myself here.

Love this bloom but I can’t also identify it.

A mixture of different plants…

Every time we come home, we always have buko juice at the ready.

Healthy and lovely bromeliads.

A white Bougainvillea

Love to have this color in my garden.

Love these double-petaled blooms too.

When I last came home, that street light in front of the house attached to the coconut tree was almost leveled with it. Now the tree is grown.

What’s this again? I’m hopeless.

Took shot of my nephew’s house near our place, a few meters across the road.

Countryside scenery that I’ve missed for so long. I brought home two jackfruits which I will cook later.

Alugbati

Looking at the fruits which resemble blackberries, I was fascinated. I was looking for some subjects to practice my macro shots on early this morning when I noticed these dark purple fruits hanging in a trellis which hubby made a few months ago. I don’t eat alugbati, preferring the more popular camote tops  and the fresh young leaves of chayote.  Lots of persuasions from hubby to try it, steamed  and squeezed with kalamansi or mixed with mongo didn’t induce me  to even taste it, but he eats it like he is eating  camote tops that I like.

Known as Malabar spinach, Indian spinach or  climbing spinach, luo kui shu( in Chinese), is one of the most popular indigenous leafy vegetables in the Philippines. Originally from India, it is usually found in hedges and cultivated areas ans is extensively grown in market gardens and home gardens.

Its leaves are somewhat fleshy, ovate or heart-shaped. The fruit is fleshy  and turns purple when it matures. The young stems, leaves and shoots are blanched. One of the reasons why I get turned-off is because the flavor is a little earthy and the texture when cooked is slimy. I later learned that it has lots of uses and nutritional values. The purplish dye from the ripe fruit is used as food color while the cooked roots are used for treating diarrhea. The cooked stems and leaves are good laxative and the flowers are used as antidote for poison. A paste of the leaves is applied  to treat  boils while a paste of the root is  good for swelling.

Alugbati grows well under full sunlight in hot, humid climate like ours. It may take sometime before I’ll learn to eat this nutritional vegetable but until then, I’ll just watch hubby enjoy his plate of steamed alugbati and fried fish to go with it.