Tag Archive | garden veggies

Garden Blooms

It’s been a long time since I updated my blog here. As I only have my cellphone now and my tab used as cameras, I am not taking more pictures. This morning though, I was at the garden looking at some  summer blooms and I can’t help but take these shots with my tab.

My two jackfruit trees are bearing fruits again. I counted, there were about twenty of them excluding the two  young fruits I harvested earlier to cook in coconut cream. My family loves Guinataang Langka.  That’s what we call it here.

My shrimp plants are blooming too. They are here everywhere in the garden.  Even my sweet-scented Amazon Lilies are bearing flowers.

The morning sun is trying to show its face in these lovely shrimp plants.  I wish I could just point my cellphone camera in the beauty of my small garden.

What’s New In My Garden?

“It was such a pleasure to sink one’s hands into the warm earth, to feel at one’s fingertips the possibilities of the new season.”  – Kate Morton

Such a shame! I only have about ninety posts here (this one is the 91st). I think this is the most neglected of all my five blogs here on WordPress.  Anyway, I am again sharing some new blooms and newly planted ones in my small garden. Took all these shots from my tab so some  are a bit grainy.

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This plant is attractive when the young leaves have that orange hue,   the leaves  change back to all green as they mature.

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I am thinking of uprooting this shrub altogether  then have some stems replanted. It is growing wild but the flowers are just lovely.

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Aren’t they lovely?  They are my dwarf plumeria.  I bought a little pot three years ago and  it is nicely flowering. It is summer and  the plants love the heat.

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Josef bought me two of this last Sunday on our way to Church. It’s a cross between a fern and a palm but I don’t know its exact name.  Come December, it might be big enough to use as  Christmas tree in the garden.

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Grown from seed, this blackberry is nicely thriving in the sun.  I have five of this. a friend sent me some seeds  a year ago. I wanted to plant them all but I don’t have enough space in the garden so they are just behind the house where they enjoy early morning sun.

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And this is another surprise, my sweet-scented Gardenia. This is an early bloom since my lone shrub usually produces  flowers during the month of May.

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Our two Jackfruit trees  are bearing fruits again.  We have about nine big fruits now.  Last month, I picked two young ones and cooked them in coconut cream.  There are still so many small buds growing in  all the branches. I hope they would mature like these.

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And the nice surprise?  Look!  Josef discovered them only yesterday because they were covered by our potted Bromeliad.  They are growing directly from the ground on a small branch  sharing a small space with our other plants. I have to transfer some pots so they could breathe.

The joys of gardening, it really made my morning.

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It’s nice to be back and share my garden finds. I guess it’s time to take hold of my camera again and take a few shots. Look what I’ve found.

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I didn’t plant this  tomato shrub but just saw it growing side by side with our peanut grass at the front garden. It was a delight to see these green  tomatoes waiting to ripen. Something comes to mind, botanically speaking, tomatoes are fruits  but we consider them vegetables. How’s that again? I am getting confused.

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Our two jackfruit trees are laden with fruits growing in almost every tip of each branch. The sad thing though, not all of them will grow big at all.  Mom says the fruits with smooth skin are the  ones that would  ripen and grow big, the rest will just dry up and fall. Every morning, I would count the fruits, can’t wait to harvest some  in a  month or two.

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One thing I love about our calamansi trees (we have two) are the scents of the flowers. Calamansi or Philippine lime bear fruits all year round and they are perfect in almost any dish that need a little spicing up. They could be used to  marinate meat or as sauces for grilled or fried food.  Ripe fruits are excellent  as juices too.

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Not to be left behind are my pink Bougainvillea.  I just love the pink blooms.

Fresh Harvest

It’s been a while since I last posted here. having four blogs to maintain makes one neglect the others. Anyway, I’ll be updating this site from time to time, I just got so used in staying at Dreams and Escapes. It’s nice to see our modest vegetable garden bearing fruits again.

Fresh ampalaya, jute leaves and calamansi. Jute or what we call saluyot in the vernacular is medicinal too. Three days ago, I harvested more than kilo of calamansi (Philippine lime).  My son and I love calamansi juice and having a glass of freshly squeezed calamansi is better than commercially produced fruit drinks.

We also have this jackfruit growing nicely. Maybe in a month or two, it would be ready for harvest.

And these new shoots would be perfect for that yummy “ginataang langka”.

Alugbati

Looking at the fruits which resemble blackberries, I was fascinated. I was looking for some subjects to practice my macro shots on early this morning when I noticed these dark purple fruits hanging in a trellis which hubby made a few months ago. I don’t eat alugbati, preferring the more popular camote tops  and the fresh young leaves of chayote.  Lots of persuasions from hubby to try it, steamed  and squeezed with kalamansi or mixed with mongo didn’t induce me  to even taste it, but he eats it like he is eating  camote tops that I like.

Known as Malabar spinach, Indian spinach or  climbing spinach, luo kui shu( in Chinese), is one of the most popular indigenous leafy vegetables in the Philippines. Originally from India, it is usually found in hedges and cultivated areas ans is extensively grown in market gardens and home gardens.

Its leaves are somewhat fleshy, ovate or heart-shaped. The fruit is fleshy  and turns purple when it matures. The young stems, leaves and shoots are blanched. One of the reasons why I get turned-off is because the flavor is a little earthy and the texture when cooked is slimy. I later learned that it has lots of uses and nutritional values. The purplish dye from the ripe fruit is used as food color while the cooked roots are used for treating diarrhea. The cooked stems and leaves are good laxative and the flowers are used as antidote for poison. A paste of the leaves is applied  to treat  boils while a paste of the root is  good for swelling.

Alugbati grows well under full sunlight in hot, humid climate like ours. It may take sometime before I’ll learn to eat this nutritional vegetable but until then, I’ll just watch hubby enjoy his plate of steamed alugbati and fried fish to go with it.